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20131202
20131210
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CSPAN 22
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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
st century civil rights agenda with education, choice, voting rights, and prison reform as its foundation. no one's life should be ruined because of a youthful mistake. no one should be thrown in prison for years and decades when they haven't hurt anyone but themselves. no one should lose their voting rights because they spent time in prison. it does us no good to create jobs for young people in detroit if they can't later get such jobs because of an out-of-control war on drugs. mandatory minimum sentences that force judges to give 10, 20, sometimes 50 year sentences for drug offenses are crazy and they've got to end. it is a human tragedy. it is an idea of justice. and there need to be new voices from either party that will say it's time to change. this is whay i've joined with democrats on this. [applause] i've joined with democrats on this. i'm working with senator leahy from vermont to try to give junls more freedom, more leeway when it comes to sentencing. if it were your kid would you want to know whether it was their first crime? whether there's a chance to rehabilitate
they send their kids to school. a pastor says school choice is a civil rights issue. he might be right. we are part of the country that tries school choice as benefits, especially minorities. too much the government says here is a school in your district, it is failing, tough luck. people in detroit have had enough of this. 80% percent of the parents in detroit would have enough choice would take another choice. families want the freedom to choose to send their kids were they would like to send them. i want them to have as many choices as possible. i live where public schools are good. my kids are sent to the public high school in kentucky. in my county, my kids can choose from five different schools. they have to compete with each other. i cannot understand how anyone could be against competition, empowering parents with choice. the freedom to innovate is important. charter schools get rid of this top-down approach, one-size-fits-all. study showed charter kids learn more material than their counterparts. opponents of school choice complained and say that is government money. you sent gove
of the senate on november 22, 2013, at 10:52 a.m. appointments, united states commission on civil rights. with best wishes i am sincerely, karen l. haas, clerk of the house. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to clause 12-a of rule 1, the chair declares the house in recess until approximately >> with one minute compete -- speeches and pleaded. three bills on the bills today -- agenda today. to the white house for today's legislative breeding -- briefing that began just a few moments ago. qwest what i think is important to note is that the queuing system is a feature designed to improve the user experience. we talked about concurrent users , it was always going to be the case that on a day like today we would see a surge beyond even the vastly improved capacity result oft are the the changes that have been made and the fixes that have been made. what was important when we talked about this for -- before, is that we had a queuing system that made for a better user experience so that individuals could get into that queue, could he notified when the best time to return to healthcare.gov and e
civil rights agenda with education, choice, voting rights no one life should be ruined because of a youthful mistake. no one should be thrown in but themselves. no one should lose their voting rights because they spent time in prison. it does us no good to create jobs for young people in detroit if they can't later get such jobs because of out of control war on drugs. .... they should be able to vote and have a life and build a family. their children should look at what comes from happiness and hard work. we talk about the family unit owing down the drain, and we are preventing families from going back to the. we must address the federal mindset that values our rest rates. it is not because white kids in affluent suburbs are not also smoking pot, it is they tend to be arrested and do not have as good representation and the police gravitate there because it is easier. it has been going on for a long time. it is not a purposeful racism, but we have a racial return on the war on drugs that is not fair. minority communities are easy targets. some say that is good politics. maybe it
rights of all americans. in addition economic freedom, we have to have a 21st century civil rights agenda with education, choice, voting rights and prison reform. no one life should be ruined because of a youthful mistake. no one should be thrown in prison for years and decades when they haven't hurt anyone but themselves. no one should lose their voting rights because they spent time in prison. it does us no good to create jobs for young people in detroit if they can't later get such jobs because of out of control war on drugs. they should be able to vote and have a life and build a family. their children should look at what comes from happiness and hard work. we talk about the family unit owing down the drain, and we are preventing families from going back. we must address the federal mindset that values arrest rates. >> if it were your could, would there be a chance to be rehabilitating them. it is a health problem and will not get better in prison. would you want to know that there might be other solutions? they should get back into society. they should be able to get a job. they shou
of something the civil rights leader when he said we may have arrived on these shores in different ships, but we're all now.e same boat what's going on in this town is that too often, the two parties, you think they're from different countries. they view the other side as the nemy, not the fell blow citizens with whom they occasionally disagree. but in the long run, they have he sate fate, interests in common. we have to reconcile our differences, not accentuate them. but we forget we come from a common country and common a common nd for sure destiny. final thing i say, this is something that no labels is working to overcome. in this city today, what all of do every section is forge principle compromise, the word compromise, back in the dale, my father's time, that was statesmanship. today it's a act of betrayal. your don't work with party 100% of the time, you're ostracized, there's something wrong with you. you can see this on cable tv and a variety of other things. i'll finish by recounting words that lyndon johnson, a master legislator, said once. e grew up poor in the hill country
person. the disabled people of america are fighting hard for our civil rights. nelson mandela has done a lot of work things considered for things like slavery. we have a topic similar. you are not entitled to the minimum wage here in america. we are specifically exempt. we are so inspired by the work of nelson mandela, we try to continue in that legacy. we want to make it so that our people, our disabled people, are no longer trapped in these workshops. host: why the blind exempt from the minimum wage? caller: the fair labor standards act of 1938 specifically exempts us. the idea is that disabled people are supposed to be inherently less productive. we are less than people. there are a lot of explanations. some people think they are doing by employing disabled people at a penny an our. it is exploiting us. whenever go on to real productive life. we are pushing hard to try to get that change. we want to be able to earn minimum wage for our work, or not work at all. disabled people have the the cassidy to be -- have the thatity to make the change nelson mandela made. host: thank you for
. it started with jesse helms. i rest my case. >> and strom thurmond. >> because after the civil rights act of 1964 was passed, they were very irate that the democratic party was becoming inclusive in all kinds of ways, especially racial. they started to -- 8000 fundamentalist baptist churches -- they took over the republican party levers of power gradually, so now you cannot get through the primaries to get into the general election as a smart, centrist conservative whatever, a perfectly sensible person. it is so dangerous to have one of our two parties controlled by extremists. of course, we get mad at the democrats. i am mad at the democrats every minute. then you find yourself voting for this other party. here's my plan. my plan is that we do what the right-wing democrats did and we go to the local caucuses and so on. even i am willing to look republican. i will take off this belt. [laughter] [applause] >> do you like my jacket? >> yes. we will infiltrate the caucuses. that is what they did. we will take them over. in four years, you will have a chaotic and terrible republican conventio
programs that do not respect basic civil rights and civil liberties. we need to stay vigilant in our fight for respect in this country and that has been one of our themes. whether it's on the budget as our colleague, mr. scott, just talked about, or a plethora of bills that have been brought forward by individual members. an essential to the f.y. 2014 budget that has been worked on by the congressional black caucus, which reduces the budget and creates millions of jobs in a fair and balanced way. let me just close by talking about one final area, mr. speaker, that we as members of this body need to stay focused on and that's jobs and growing the economy. in my home state of nevada, we still have a stubbornly high unemployment rate above the national average. despite improvements in certain sectors, there's far too many nevadans who are still looking for work. many who have been out of work for now more than a year, year and a half, going on two years, and i know it's part of the budget debate that will occur between now and january 15, will be this discussion about extending unemployment b
or government defendants. thus attorneys' fees provisions are mostly found in civil right, environmental protection and other statutes. the provision in this bill differs from other congressional exceptions in that it would require anyone who loses a patent claim to pay the attorneys' fees of even large corporate defendants. this is a giant deterrent to genuine inventors from filing good-faith suits to defend their valid patents claims. therefore i urge the adoption of the watt-conyers substitute which would drop the losers pays provisions from the underlying bill while still including the key reforms that are present in the underlying bill and in the senate bill drafted by senate -- senator leahy. i urge adoption of the substitute and i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman from new york yields back. the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. goodlatte: mr. chairman, at this time i'm pleased to yield two minutes to the gentlewoman from california who has been a great person to work with on the judiciary committee and here on the floor of the house on this legis
itself has caused harms, particularly in civil rights-type cases. but where there is a private party that is alleged to have forgot the government, -- alleged to have ripped off the government, that is the false claims act. host: a few issues that the false claims act. i -- that the false claims act prohibits. host: that according to the justice department. we are talking to colette matzzie about the false claims act, some of its history, and some of its applications today. matthew is up next on our line for democrats. thanks for calling "washington journal." caller: i would like to ask about the whistleblower law. can it be used for the tarp and banks that are too big to fail and can it be used for iraq, afghanistan, and syria, the eu building that we did, and the $12 trillion deficit caused? guest: well, in that context, taking the war context first, there is -- you know, there have been more cases, there will continue to be more cases. it is likely there are cases under investigation. ae typical were case involves private defense contractor who has submitted a claim to the united
the modern mother of the civil rights movement, rosa parks. this past sunday, we celebrated the 58th anniversary of rosa parks refusing to give up her seat on that bus in montgomery, alabama. i am so proud to stand here from the great state of ohio because it was the great state of ohio that was the first state in this nation to name december 1 rosa parks day. on thursday and friday of this week in our district, we will bring people from all over the state to pay tribute to her. and we will bring in more than 600 little children who will learn about civil rights and understand the value of working together. the last day, 1955, she started something larger than herself. she stood -- she sat down so we could stand up. mr. speaker, it is my honor to be a part of the legislation that created december 1 in ohio as rosa parks day. thank you and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speake
a positive environment for civil society and to protect the rights of all ukrainians to express their views on the country's future in a constructive and peaceful manner. violence and intimidation should have no place in today's ukraine. to support the aspirations of the ukrainian people to achieve a prosperous european democracy. european integration is the surest course of economic growth and strengthening ukraine's democracy. thanks very much. >> here at the end of this briefing you can see it in its entirety on c-span that -- you can wor. live coverage here on c-span again now coming back at 5:00 p.m. eastern. we posted a question on our facebook page asking about your thoughts on congressional prod uctivity. a couple of responses. michael says, when you elect people who are contentious of government, you'll get that government. tracy offers the, hail hail term limits, hourly pay. congress has to me perks, and privileges. you can post your thoughts at facebook.com/bcspan, . coming up on c-span2, french opposition leader john prince walkup a -- will talk about his recent nuclear deal wit
or their legislatures judicial appointments and those kinds of things. we fought a civil war over this once before, you know, and i just don't think it is right. who --tion would be -- president obama when he severed -- when hed look for sat for 20 years and listen to reverend wright? guest: you know, i'm not quite sure how to answer that question. that there is a lot of variation between the states and the federal systems, and that is really one of the things that we found was that there is so much of a difference between a federal standards and the states, and the states really have so much variation between them. some of them -- the rules are state, soto the you have the separation of powers, you have the state rights. they would have a really unique form and unique standards. i could give examples of your interested. host: sure. guest: in new jersey, they asked the justices to discuss if they own any property in atlantic city. atlantic city geographically the tiny part of new jersey. i guess this came from interest in making sure there were not corruptive influences and gambling. in north carolina,
. i do not see it as a civil war. i see it as what happens when a party is out of power, and there isn't one unifying voice. as i ask you guys right now, who is the leader of the republican party today? >> boehner? >> is my friend. i will tell him that he has one person who thinks he is the leader. >> [inaudible] >> it isn't john boehner. he has no control over his caucus. even in the senate, you look at ted cruz. he was --it is so loose. i would say chris christie. >> if i went around this room and i asked everybody who their leader is, either we get no answer, or 40 different answers. when you do not have somebody that sets the standards, this happens. people start talking. you start sounding dysfunctional. that is happening to republicans. it hasn't happened to democrats because they have a president in the white house. there is no bigger bully pulpit than the presidency. frankly, he keeps them in line. when the progressive democrats want to go off the reservation, they have ways of keeping them in line. all sorts of things. i think that is one of the problems we are having. i thin
kinds of things. we fought a civil war over this once before, you know, and i just don't think it is right. who --tion would be -- president obama when he severed -- when hed look for sat for 20 years and listen to reverend wright? guest: you know, i'm not quite sure how to answer that question. that there is a lot of variation between the states and the federal systems, and that is really one of the things that we found was that there is so much of a difference between a federal standards and the states, and the states really have so much variation between them. some of them -- the rules are state, soto the you have the separation of powers, you have the state rights. they would have a really unique form and unique standards. i could give examples of your interested. host: sure. guest: in new jersey, they asked the justices to discuss if they own any property in atlantic city. atlantic city geographically the tiny part of new jersey. i guess this came from interest in making sure there were not corruptive influences and gambling. in north carolina, they asked for any -- if any
in this way. >> i follow on exactly from the comments of the right honorable member and her reminiscence but also her mild remonstrance, which is absolutely well made, that we are talking here about a politician. certainly in the civil encounters with president mandela in one capacity, and with mr. mandela post-presidency in other capacities, not only was his sense of humor telling, but so was the self-deprecating use to which he put that humour, lest there was any thought that a political halo could be bestowed upon him. he certainly did not want that, and he would not want that to be part of his legacy today. i mention humor because my first introduction to nelson mandela was far from fortuitous. he was then president, and enormous numbers of parliamentarians had somehow all descended on south africa at the same time. they had come from new zealand, australia, here, ireland, france all on fact-finding missions. it was interesting that these fact-finding missions all coincided with the rugby world cup that was taking place in south africa. given that there were more visiting foreign pol
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)